Tricycle Talks

Podcast series featuring leading voices and thinkers in the contemporary Buddhist world

The Task Is Being You

With Mark Epstein
The Task Is Being You

The Buddha had a prescription to end suffering—the eightfold path. But can the Western tradition of psychotherapy build upon these essential steps? Here, Buddhist psychotherapist and bestselling author Epstein talks with Tricycle contributing editor Amy Gross about how the two realms of wisdom view the idea of self as both problematic and helpful. Drawing from his new book, Advice Not Given: A Guide to Getting Over Yourself, to discuss the ways meditation illuminates aspects of ourselves that we’re afraid or ashamed of, allowing us to let go of the identities that constrict us.

Listen Now on Tricycle | iTunes | SoundCloud

What Do Buddhists Mean When They Talk About Not-Self?

With Guy Armstrong
What Do Buddhists Mean When They Talk About Not-Self?

The foundational Buddhist concept of “no-self” can be a headbanger. What does it mean that our self is fundamentally empty? And if that’s true, who are we? In our latest Tricycle Talks podcast, Insight meditation teacher Guy Armstrong explains the concept to Tricycle contributing editor Amy Gross. Drawing from his book Emptiness: A Practical Guide for Meditators, he breaks down what happens when we stop constructing a sense of “I, me, mine” and begin to let go of the extraneous mental activity that leads to unnecessary suffering.

Listen Now on Tricycle | iTunes | SoundCloud

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(Part 1) Mindfulness in Prison and Beyond

With Fleet Maull
(Part 1) Mindfulness in Prison and Beyond

In this two-part Tricycle Talks episode, Tricycle’s web editor, Wendy Joan Biddlecombe, speaks with Acharya Fleet Maull at the Engaged Mindfulness Institute in Deerfield, Massachusetts, about his work, and why he’s moving beyond prisons to train the next generation of mindfulness teachers.

Listen Now on Tricycle | iTunes | SoundCloud

Why (Science Says) Buddhism Is True

With Robert Wright
Why (Science Says) Buddhism Is True

In this episode of Tricycle Talks, best-selling author Robert Wright speaks with Tricycle’s web editor, Wendy Joan Biddlecombe, about how evolutionary psychology supports what the Buddha taught us about suffering and not being satisfied in the present moment. In the talk, Wright explains why we haven’t evolved past difficult emotions such as anxiety and how mindfulness meditation can provide a way to work through—and maybe even free us from—them.

Listen Now on Tricycle | iTunes | SoundCloud

When Your Sangha’s Sex Scandal Goes Viral

With Shozan Jack Haubner
When Your Sangha’s Sex Scandal Goes Viral

Shozan Jack Haubner, the pen name of a Zen monk, went to the monastery in search of wisdom—and left with a sex scandal. Haubner joins Tricycle’s executive editor Emma Varvaloucas in this podcast to discuss how writing helps him unravel the “big things” in life; the patterns of behavior commonly seen in communities where sexual abuse occurs between teacher and student; and his advice for any group that has a problem that’s been driven underground. “It’s alive,” he says, “and it’s calling for you to deal with it.”

Listen Now on Tricycle | iTunes | SoundCloud

How Religion Can Bring Peace to a Fearful World

With Michael Kinnamon
How Religion Can Bring Peace to a Fearful World

We live in a world of fear. But need we be driven by it? In this episode of Tricycle Talks, Dr. Pilar Jennings, a Tibetan Buddhist practitioner and psychotherapist, speaks with Michael Kinnamon, former Dean of the Lexington Theological Seminary and author of the The Witness of Religion in an Age of Fear, about the restlessness, anxiety, and even panic characteristic of contemporary society.

Listen Now on Tricycle | iTunes | SoundCloud

The Gift of Anger and Other Lessons from My Grandfather Mahatma Gandhi

With Arun Gandhi
The Gift of Anger and Other Lessons from My Grandfather Mahatma Gandhi

“Anger is like electricity: it is just as powerful and just as useful, but only if you use it intelligently.” So told Mahatma Gandhi to his grandson Arun Gandhi, who lived with the political and spiritual giant on his ashram between the ages of 12 and 14. In our latest podcast, Tricycle’s executive editor Emma Varvaloucas sits down with Arun to discuss the lessons that he’s learned from his grandfather about working with anger and cultivating peace.

Listen Now on Tricycle | iTunes | SoundCloud

Learning to Living Fully

With Frank Ostaseski
Learning to Living Fully

A pioneer in end-of-life care, Frank Ostaseski brings his Buddhist practice—and a startlingly respectful compassion—to the bedsides of people who are face to face with dying. In his new book, The Five Invitations: What Death Can Teach Us About Living Fully, he has learned lessons that “are too important to be left to our final hours”: By turning away from death, he says, we also turn away from the preciousness of life and our ability to live fully. Ostaseski guides us through what is otherwise scary territory with kindness, warmth, wisdom and humor. As Rachel Naomi Remen, M.D., writes in her exquisite introduction, “Death, like love, is intimate, and that intimacy is the condition of the deepest learning.” Contributing editor Amy Gross sits down for a conversation with Ostaseski about his work in our latest Tricycle Talk. Gross teaches mindfulness-based stress reduction at the Open Center in New York City. His lessons can help all of us—the sick and the well, the old and the young—live a life of bravery, intimacy, honesty, and ease, even alongside our fear of dying.

Listen Now on Tricycle | iTunes | SoundCloud

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Film Club

Buddhist films and discussion for the Tricycle Community

Chandra

Chandra

Seven-year-old Chandra is excited to visit his mother and newborn sibling but to his grandfather, it’s a different story as they journey on foot through earthquake-hit Kathmandu.

Directed by Asmita Shrish and Fateme Ahmadi

Magazine

The Buddhist Review

Trike Daily

Daily wisdom, teachings & critique

How Rinzai Zen Came to America

History & Philosophy

How Rinzai Zen Came to America

Ruth Fuller Everett was the first Western woman to experience sudden enlightenment; Sokei-an Sasaki was the first Zen teacher to live and lecture in the United States. Zen Odyssey tells the story of their partnership, which laid the foundation for Zen in the West.

By Sandy Boucher
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