Tricycle Podcasts

Our podcast series: For the MomentTricycle Talks

— Episode #57

The Middle Way Through the Long Haul

With Toni Bernhard
The Middle Way Through the Long Haul

In this episode of Tricycle Talks, Tricycle’s editor-in-chief James Shaheen talks to author Toni Bernhard about her Buddhist practice, how her journey to self-acceptance and authorship began, and what advice she would give to people who are “too young to be sick,” or those who are suffering from long haul COVID symptoms.

Listen Now on Tricycle | iTunes | SoundCloud

— Episode #13

Bringing Our Practice into the Workplace  

With Pamela Weiss
Bringing Our Practice into the Workplace  

Pamela is a teacher in the Insight Meditation and Soto Zen Buddhist traditions and the founder of Appropriate Response, an organization dedicated to bringing mindful awareness to the workplace. In this two-part episode, Pamela leads a before and after work meditation to help integrate our practice into our daily life and work. 

Listen Now on Tricycle | iTunes | SoundCloud

— Episode #56

Grieving Mindfully

With Sameet Kumar
Grieving Mindfully

We have end-of-life rituals for a reason—to help us accept loss and fully grieve. With well over half a million lives lost to the pandemic so far, grieving may look different under lockdown but it has no off-switch. In this episode of  Tricycle Talks, Sameet Kumar, a clinical psychologist, grief counselor, and author, joins Tricycle’s editor-in-chief, James Shaheen, and co-host Sharon Salzberg for a conversation about grief, how we’ve come to redefine it during this time of social distancing, and the importance of staying present to it. 

Listen Now on Tricycle | iTunes | SoundCloud

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— Episode #12

Be a Walking Buddha

With Mindy Newman
Be a Walking Buddha

Mindy Newman is a psychotherapist and a meditation teacher at the Nalanda Institute for Contemplative Science. In this episode, Mindy leads a walking meditation  to help cultivate love and compassion for all beings we may encounter. 

Listen Now on Tricycle | iTunes | SoundCloud

— Episode #55

Becoming a Buddhist Climate Scientist  

With Dekila Chungyalpa
Becoming a Buddhist Climate Scientist  

For the last 12 years, Dekila Chungyalpa has worked with religious and indigenous leaders, scientists, and policymakers to design community-based environmental and climate programs. But having grown up in the northeastern Indian state of Sikkim, surrounded by strong women who chose to walk the monastic path, Chungyalpa hasn’t always found it easy to show up as both a devout Tibetan Buddhist and a conservation scientist.

In this episode of Tricycle Talks, Chungyalpa shares with Tricycle’s editor James Shaheen how she’s come to integrate her commitments to science and faith, deal with climate deniers, and head the Loka Initiative, a climate-change outreach program that empowers and uplifts religious communities. In the face of so much eco-anxiety, climate distress, and doom and gloom, it is ultimately Buddhist teachings on emptiness, impermanence, non-attachment, and compassion, she says, that sustain her.

Listen Now on Tricycle | iTunes | SoundCloud

— Episode #11

Goodnight Metta

With Sumi Loundon Kim
Goodnight Metta

Sumi Loundon Kim is the Buddhist chaplain at Yale University and a long-time student of the Theravada tradition. In this episode, Sumi leads a bedtime meditation on lovingkindness for the family and children. 

Listen Now on Tricycle | iTunes | SoundCloud

— Episode #54

Inside Tricycle’s Spring 2021 Issue 

With Seth Zuiho Segall, Daisy Hernández, and Arthur Sze
Inside<i> Tricycle’s</i> Spring 2021 Issue 

In this episode of Tricycle Talks, Editor and Publisher James Shaheen is joined by three contributors—Seth Zuiho Segall, Daisy Hernández, and Arthur Sze—to take a closer look at our Spring 2021 issue.

Listen Now on Tricycle | iTunes | SoundCloud

— Episode #53

On Being Black and Buddhist in America

With Pamela Ayo Yetunde and Cheryl Giles
On Being Black and Buddhist in America

Race-based suffering, resilience, and transformation are at the core of a new collection of “freedom stories” written by Black Buddhist voices. In our latest episode of Tricycle Talks, editor and publisher James Shaheen speaks about what it means to be Black and Buddhist in America with Pamela Ayo Yetunde and Cheryl Giles, coeditors of Black and Buddhist: What Buddhism Can Teach Us About Race, Resilience, Transformation, and Freedom.

In this conversation, Yetunde, a pastoral counselor and practitioner in the Zen and Insight traditions, and Giles, a professor of pastoral care and counseling at Harvard Divinity School and clinical psychologist, examine racial ignorance and color blindness in Buddhist communities as well as how their dharma practice has helped them to reaffirm and celebrate their Blackness. Together, they reflect on how this anthology of liberation stories can offer all practitioners, regardless of race, a different way of being—of relating to ignorance, anger, trauma, fear, and pain.

Listen Now on Tricycle | iTunes | SoundCloud

— Episode #52

Buddhist Magic and Why We Shouldn’t Cast It Aside

With Sam van Schaik
Buddhist Magic and Why We Shouldn’t Cast It Aside

In his new book, Buddhist Magic: Divination, Healing, and Enchantment Through the Ages, Sam van Schaik, a textual historian and practitioner of Tibetan Buddhism, makes a compelling case for why we should pay attention to Buddhism’s magical heritage—and what we lose by casting it aside.

In our latest podcast episode with Tricycle’s Editor and Publisher James Shaheen, van Schaik debunks misperceptions about early Buddhism by showing how magical literature can offer a more holistic and realistic view of Buddhism from the ground up. He also paints a vivid picture of the role monks and nuns may have played in the magical-gig economy as well as how we can view mindfulness meditation in a comparable way—as the magic of our current age.

Listen Now on Tricycle | iTunes | SoundCloud

Film Club

Buddhist films and discussion for the Tricycle Community

Planetary

“The really wonderful thing that happened to me when I was in space,” says astronaut Mae Jemison in Planetary, “was this feeling of belonging to the entire universe.” Through stunning footage and wide-ranging interviews, this documentary delivers one central message: Everything on our fragile planet is interconnected.

By Guy Reid

Magazine

The Buddhist Review

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Daily wisdom, teachings & critique

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