Are you already ruminating about green bean casserole with extra fried onions on top?

Thanksgiving, while often an excuse to stuff ourselves and not feel too guilty, is also an opportunity to reconnect with family—those we may not see as often as we like (or those we can only stand to see during the holidays).

Perhaps Turkey Day isn’t the best time to remind you about the Buddha’s teaching that taking the right amount of food is key to practicing the Middle Way. But we hope the following five articles will inspire you to reflect on all the other beings who made it possible for the pumpkin to travel from its patch to your tummy (and these lessons on moderation will still be here for you on Black Friday).

Giving Thanks from Your Gut
By Wendy Joan Biddlecombe Agsar

Already coveting a second slice of pumpkin pie? The five tips from a Tibetan Buddhist abbess can help us slow down, redirect our cravings, and practice compassion and kindness every time we sit down to eat.

Eating Just the Right Amount
By John Kain

Oryoki, often translated as “just the right amount,” is a highly choreographed Zen ritual of serving and eating food: it exposes our mental patterns and sticking points.

Confronting Family Dynamics during the Holidays
By Lauren Krauze

One practitioner loosens her grasp on the past, realizing how surrendering, or letting go, is very much part of our tradition.

Food for the Gods
By Noa Jones

Dresti is a Tibetan dish usually served on special occasions. We think this sweet saffron rice filled with raisins and cashews could replace that tired old sweet potato casserole.

Tricycle Teachings: Generosity

Generosity lies at the very core of Buddhist practice. This e-book features fourteen reflections from our most cherished teachers on the topic, including Joseph Goldstein, Thanissaro Bhikkhu, and Gil Fronsdal.

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