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Special Sections

Conceptions of Happiness

Special Section Meditation & Practice

Conceptions of Happiness

Happiness is awakening to the question “Who is happy, who is unhappy, who lives, and who dies?” True happiness is uncaused, arising from the very nature of being itself. We seek happiness only when we are asleep to our true nature—dreaming that enlightenment is over there, somewhere else. But we are all, already, what we […]

By Daniel Goleman

Departments

Insights

Live A Little

From the new book The Real Meaning of Life, a collection of posts from an online forum responding to the question, “What is the meaning of life?”

By Melissa S. T. Eng

Editors View

Settle for the Stereo?

We’ve all heard that happiness can’t be bought, but how many of us live as if this were really true? As contributing editor Joan Duncan Oliver reports in her opener to this issue’s special section (“The Happiness Craze“), shopping outperforms “football, golf, and NASCAR combined,” making it America’s most popular pastime. Putting all empirical evidence […]

By James Shaheen
Contributors Fall 2005

Contributors

Contributors Fall 2005

Contributing editor Joan Duncan Oliver has spent the past year immersed in the subject of happiness, first to write a book—Happiness: How to Find It and Keep It—and then to edit a special section for this issue on happiness. Is she happier as a result? “Hard to say. But it convinced me that Buddhist practice […]

By Tricycle

Insights

A Blessing For Eddie J.

An entry from an online journal by Jotipalo Bhikkhu on his walking pilgrimage from New Orleans to the Arrow River Forest Hermitage in Thunder Bay, Ontario. Jotipalo, a Buddhist monk, and fellow pilgrim Austin Stewart find some Christian faith in Mississippi. Day 14: We got onto Highway 467 this morning and we noticed two middle-aged […]

By Jotipalo Bhikkhu
Moving Target

On Relationships Personal Reflections

Moving Target

As a meditator, have you ever practiced eating mindfully—let’s say a salad or a baked potato? Perhaps, then, as you tried to stay in touch with each bite, each chew, each subtle flavor of potato, butter, salt, pepper, and chives, you found yourself struggling through a haze of memories, fantasies, and scenarios trying to really […]

By Erik Hansen

Insights

Insights & Outtakes Fall 2005

I’LL DRINK TO THAT Beer connoisseurs may be familiar with Singha, one the most popular beers in Thailand. Less well known is that the singha is a venerable Thai Buddhist symbol: a sort of combination lion and snake frequently seen guarding the entrances to Thai temples. And even more obscure is the way in which […]

By Tricycle

Reviews

Books In Brief Fall 2005

The DhammapadaGil Fronsdal,translatorBoston: Shambhala Publications, 2005, 176 pp.; $18.95 (cloth) In his highly praised new translation of this most essential Buddhist text, Gil Fronsdal brings to bear his considerable experience both as a scholar and a practitioner. Trained as a teacher in the Soto Zen and Insight Meditation traditions, Fronsdal also has a Ph.D. in […]

By Tricycle

Letters

Letters to the Editor Fall 2005

HANKIES OR KLEENEX?While I agree with Susan Moon’s sentiments regarding joyful practice and the need to live by example, “Stop Shopping” (Summer 2005) left me with the lingering question: How and where do we find hope? The ideals of caring for Mother Earth and low-impact living and consumption have been around since at least the […]

By Tricycle

Reviews Arts & Culture

The Natural: Ruth Denison

Dancing in the Dharma: The Life and Teachings of Ruth Denison Sandy Boucher Boston: Beacon Press, 2005 264 pp.; $25.95 (cloth) Though its roots shoot back to the nineteenth century and earlier, dharma practice in the United States is a uniquely twentieth-century product. World War II and its aftermath, the drug culture, the Vietnam War, […]

By Mary Talbot
Temple
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